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Q&A with Kendra Graham

Livestock specialist is fifth-generation farmer 

What do you do in your current role with the University of Missouri? In my role, I provide Missourians with unbiased, research-based information about livestock. I also help producers understand how they can then take that information and apply it specifically to their operation.    MU Extension programs I am involved in as a livestock specialist include Pearls of Production Women…

MU Plays Crucial Role in New NSF Artificial Intelligence Institute

Collaborative institute will use AI to realistically predict how crops respond to various conditions

The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced the establishment of the AI Institute for Resilient Agriculture (AIIRA), one of 11 new NSF National Artificial Intelligence Research Institutes that will work to advance AI technologies and their associated benefits to society. The AIIRA will be led by Iowa State University (ISU) and feature collaboration across eight institutions, including the University…

Cattle Losing Adaptations to Environmental Stressors, MU Researchers Find

Researchers pave the way for genetic tests of cattle that can look for the presence of specific adaptations, such as heat resistance

As a fourth-generation cattle farmer, Jared Decker knows that cattle suffer from health and productivity issues when they are taken from one environment–which the herd has spent generations adapting to–to a place with a different climate, a different elevation or even different grass. But as a researcher at the University of Missouri, Decker also sees an opportunity to use science…

Unconscious Biases can Drive Foodborne Illness Outbreaks, MU Researchers Find

Study concludes outbreak prevention policies should account for inadvertent behaviors

In the midst of a pandemic that has claimed more than 2 million lives worldwide and disrupted nearly every facet of society since it appeared more than a year ago, understanding the factors that create and facilitate disease outbreaks is more important than ever. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have determined that cognitive biases — patterns of errors…

Breakthrough Could Lead to Early Detection of Pregnancy Complications

MU researchers studied fluid secreted in a uterine model that could one day stave off complications such as miscarriage or birth defects

Constantine Simintiras and his colleagues in Thomas Spencer’s lab have found a non-invasive way to study fluid produced in the uterus during pregnancy. The quest to create safer, more successful pregnancies is one of the top goals of modern science. While pregnancy is better understood today than ever before, with improvements in technology helping to lower the risk of negative…

Piecing Together the Puzzles of Bird Genomes

MU researcher is part of an international effort to sequence the genomes of more than 70,000 species of animals, shining a light on the role of genetics in everything from behavior to disease

In 2003, scientists finished sequencing the entire human genome, paving the way for new discoveries about genetic disorders and the numerous ways that genes influence behavior, health and other traits. But the importance of a complete genome for scientific reference is not limited to humans — researchers are now engaged in an all-out push to assemble the genomes of vertebrates…

A Burning Passion for the Good Kind of Forest Fire

With the help of tree rings, an MU researcher is on a mission to show the world that not all fires are harmful

Michael Stambaugh wants people to know that fire is not always bad. He knows that to some people, this is like saying water is dry, and after 20 years as a researcher at the University of Missouri, he’s still trying to show the good that can come from one of nature’s most powerful forces. “Fire is a historical legacy,” said Stambaugh,…

National Science Foundation Taps Danforth Center to Lead New Institute to Advance the Restoration of Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems

The $12.5 million collaborative program includes 26 scientists and educators from eight institutions, including the University of Missouri

The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center today announced a $12.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to establish the New Roots for Restoration Biology Integration Institute (NRR-BII). Allison Miller, Ph.D., a member of the Danforth Center and professor of biology at Saint Louis University, will serve as the director of the NRR-BII, a collaboration between eight organizations, involving…

A Historic Dedication

CAFNR dedicates the Henry Kirklin Plant Sciences Learning Laboratory

On Feb. 24, the 151st anniversary of the founding of our college, CAFNR recognized Henry Kirklin, a celebrated Black farmer and educator who lived in and around Columbia from 1858 until his death in 1938, with the naming of the Henry Kirklin Plant Sciences Learning Laboratory, and the establishment of a scholarship for underrepresented minority students studying plant sciences, in…