Wildlife ⋅ Page 1

Covering Their Tracks

Mike Byrne unravels the mystery of where the wild things go

Whether a creature has feathers, fur or fins, it really doesn’t matter to Mike Byrne. He just wants to know where it’s going and what it might do when it gets there. Byrne is one of the newest faculty members in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at the University of Missouri, arriving on campus in June 2017.…

Broadening the Horizon

Wurdack Research Center field day offers extensive information

Attendees of the annual Wurdack Research Center field day were able to learn about everything from ticks to timber to wildlife damage management on Friday, Oct. 6. The field day featured several presentations, as well as an opportunity to meet Christopher Daubert, Vice Chancellor and Dean of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. Daubert began…

Return of the Bird

Researchers at Quail Field Day will share ways to improve quail numbers

Bradford Research Center is like many farms across the state in that each year they grow soybeans, corn and bountiful amounts of vegetables. For years, the center near Columbia never had quail on the property. It’s a growing dilemma across the country due to habitat loss and spreading urbanization. But thanks to work in the last decade, researchers are seeing…

An SEC First

Millspaugh is first recipient of MU's SEC Faculty Achievement Award

Joshua J. Millspaugh, Pauline O’Connor Distinguished Professor of Wildlife Management, was chosen as the first recipient of the University of Missouri’s Southeastern Conference Faculty Achievement Award. This annual award recognizes one professor from each of the 14 SEC member universities who have meritorious records in teaching and scholarship and who serve as role models for other faculty and students. To…

MU study looks at wildlife impact on city children

The future of wildlife conservation in the city depends on the next generation, but there is concern urban children may not be in touch with wildlife. With ethnic minority groups making up a large portion of city populations, a University of Missouri study looked at the experiences urban minority kids have with wildlife. According to the study, early involvement is important.