Swine ⋅ Page 1

A Central Resource for Biomedical Investigators and Researchers

MU receives $7.2 million for continued operation of National Swine Resource and Research Center

The University of Missouri has received $7.229 million for continued operation of the National Swine Resource and Research Center (NSRRC). The NSRRC was established in 2003 to serve as a resource for biomedical investigators and researchers, providing those individuals with access to critically needed swine models for human health and disease. The Center will continue to provide those vital services…

High on the Hog

Efficiency in hog production can offset higher feed costs

With record prices for corn and soybean meal, many hog producers are looking at alternative feed sources. Improving the efficiency of current feeds is where producers should look to cut costs.

Kizzi Roberts Earns Funding From NCR-SARE

The North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) awarded Kizzi Roberts, a graduate student in animal sciences, a $6,619.25 grant to pursue the project “A Survey of Relationships Among Rare Breeds of Pigs.” This grant was awarded as part of NCR-SARE’s Graduate Student grant program.

From Pig Cells to Stem Cells

Finding could result in better tests for stem cell therapy

Investigators at the University of Missouri have developed the ability to take regular cells from pigs’ connective tissues, known as fibroblasts, and transform them into stem cells, eliminating several of these hurdles. The discovery was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

A short trip, much learned

President Gary Forsee and Chancellor Brady Deaton tour South Farm, a nearby extension of CAFNR's research and teaching facilities

Usually, a trip to a research farm involves a long ride from main campus to the facility. When University of Missouri President Gary Forsee and Chancellor Brady Deaton visited the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource’s South Farm, the trip took only a few minutes.

Pigs, with a similar respiratory makeup to humans, are the new research models in fighting cystic fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis, an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system of about 30,000 children and adults in the U.S., has been a difficult disease to study as there are no effective animal models that mimic the human condition. That changed recently because University of Missouri and University of Iowa researchers can now produce pigs born with CF that have the exact symptoms of a newborn human with the disease.

A New Friend in the Fight Against Cystic Fibrosis

Mizzou and Iowa Researchers Take First Step to Create Cystic Fibrosis Human Model Using Pigs

For years, scientists have studied cystic fibrosis using mice in which the cystic fibrosis gene was altered. However, mice do not develop lung disease like humans with cystic fibrosis. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Iowa have taken the first step in developing a cystic fibrosis model with animals more common to humans—pigs.