Storm ⋅ Page 1

Watching the Water

Collaborations abound through stormwater best management practices

A strong storm leaves behind a good amount of rain. Where does that water go? Can it carry nutrients or pollutants? Does it cause flooding? What can be done to manage the storm water? Those are just a few of the questions that Enos Inniss and Allen Thompson continue to research. Inniss, an assistant teaching professor in civil and environmental…

Calming the Storm (Water)

Are willows key to restoring flood plains damaged by runoff?

Using 777 willow trees, a University of Missouri research team is beginning a two-year study to determine best methods to reclaim flood plain land damaged by development, keep waterways free of potential pollutants, and develop a cash crop for farmers.

Missouri Journalists Chronicle the Storm

In 1911, rural Missouri had no television or even radio. Citizens got their news daily or weekly from their community newspaper. It was through these newspapers that Missourians learned details about the devestating storm.

Award Winning Forecast

SNR graduate recognized for warning Joplin before tornado

Eric Wise, SNR Class of 2002 and weather forecaster for the National Weather Service in Springfield, Mo., was awarded the Operational Achievement Individual Award by the National Weather Association for his expert analysis that provided more than 20 minutes of warning time for the city devastated by an EF-5 rated tornado on May 22, 2011.

A Stormy Forecast

Spring Storm Season May be unusually Active, Says MU Atmospheric Sciences Researcher

The upcoming storm season could be more active than usual in Tornado Alley, according to a University of Missouri atmospheric sciences professor. Tony Lupo, department chair and professor of MU atmospheric science, said that the upcoming weather pattern resembles that of the turbulent 2002-2003 season when 109 tornadoes swept across Missouri – one of the worst seasons on record. Then,…

Ready for the storm

Campus Weather Service helps make MU "storm ready"

Students in the Department of Soils, Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences are working to make MU the first university in mid-Missouri to become certified as “storm ready” by the National Weather Service (NWS).

After the storm

Delta Center personnel help stabilize southern Missouri after one of the worst ice storms in decades

Almost in the dead center bull’s eye of the storm was the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources’ Delta Research Center in Portageville, Mo. After securing their own operation, clearing roads of downed trees and utility poles and starting generators to provide electricity, the staff of the center went out into the community to help others.

Chasing Thundersnow

MU researchers release weather balloons during winter storms

Everyone is familiar with storm chasers who follow tornadoes during the summer months. One University of Missouri researcher and a team of students will be doing much the same thing this winter in search of a rare weather phenomenon called thundersnow. The research could make the prediction of such severe snowfall events more accurate.

A promising new way to grow rice

A research program succeeds in spite of a passing hurricane

Despite being battered by the remnants of Hurricane Ike, an experiment to grow rice under center-pivot sprinkler irrigation yielded as much or more of the grain as conventional methods. This new technique may allow farmers to produce the crop in areas where it cannot be grown now, helping produce more food for a hungry world.

Up, up and away for science

Atmospheric science students use weather balloons to better understand non-summer thunderstorms

In a research and educational project to understand how non-summer thunderstorms are triggered by a process called elevated convection, Patrick Market, associate professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, will lie in wait for these cold and warm fronts to roll across Columbia, Mo.