Soybean ⋅ Page 1

Research Center Magazine: Building a Foundation

Graduate student success a focus at Greenley

This story also appears in our University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources’ Agricultural Research Center Magazine. Stop by your local Research Center to pick up a copy! You can view the magazine online by clicking here: Road to Discovery.  Each year, Kelly Nelson advises a handful of University of Missouri graduate students who are doing a…

Battling an Unseen Pest

Melissa Mitchum has devoted her career to researching soybean cyst nematodes

One of the greatest threats to crops lives underground and can’t be seen by the naked eye. Plant parasitic nematodes are microscopic roundworms that range in size from as small as 250 micrometers, or 0.0098 inches, to a maximum of several millimeters in length. It’s a parasite that Melissa Mitchum has devoted her career to fighting. Mitchum, a professor in…

The Miracle Bean

Scientists develop additional soybean reference genomes

When the Human Genome Project began in 1990, the goal was to sequence and map all of the genes that make up the human DNA. That project was completed in 2003 – and genome projects on many other species followed in subsequent years. Several crops grown in Missouri soon underwent genetic sequencing and mapping, including soybeans. The first soybean cultivar…

Soybean Disease Shows in NW Missouri

Rare white mold can cause large yield losses

University of Missouri Extension agronomy specialist Wayne Flanary says about 160 acres of soybean in northwest Missouri show symptoms of sclerotina stem rot. MU Plant Diagnostic Clinic confirmed the disease.. Also known as white mold, the disease is rare in Missouri. It can cause large losses in fields with high yield potential. The stem and root disease is usually found…

‘Mr. Soybean’ Named First Inductee into Soybean Hall of Fame

Norborne farmer Don Heil led the way for checkoff 

Missouri Soybean Hall of Fame inducted its first member, a Norborne farmer known as “Mr. Soybean,” into the Missouri Soybean Hall of Fame on April 5. The late Donald W. Heil, a lifelong farmer in the Missouri River bottoms of Carroll County, earned honors as an international promoter of soybeans, said Bill Wiebold, University of Missouri Extension soybean specialist. Wiebold,…

Expanding Their Expertise

Missouri Soybean Center focused on promoting and enhancing Missouri soybean research, teaching and extension

The University of Missouri soybean community has recently developed the Missouri Soybean Center, with a focus on, “Promoting and enhancing Missouri soybean research, teaching and extension to address current and future challenges facing the soybean industry.” The Center will be unveiled during the Missouri Soybean Center Symposium, which will take place from 8 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Thursday, April 28,…

As Heard on Insight: The Soybean Sleuth

Kristin Bilyeu's research is leading to a healthier soybean

This story also appears in our University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources’ Agricultural Research Center Magazine. Stop by your local Research Center to pick up a copy! You can view the magazine online by clicking here: Road to Discovery.  Did you miss the first airing of the thirteenth installment of our new Insight series? LISTEN NOW to the program…

Partnership for a Better Bean

University of Missouri leads soybean sequencing effort

A significant effort to sequence a large number of soybean germplasm lines in the U.S. is underway.  This project, titled “Large Scale Sequencing of Germplasm to Develop Genomic Resources for Soybean Improvement”, is being funded by the United Soybean Board and three private companies:  Bayer CropScience, DOW AgroSciences, LLC, and Monsanto.  Henry Nguyen’s Laboratory at the University of Missouri is…

Big Honor for Study of Little Pest

Melissa Mitchum receives award from American Phytopathological Society

Melissa Mitchum, associate professor of plant sciences in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, has received the American Phytopathological Society’s 2015 Syngenta Award for outstanding contributions to teaching, research or extension in plant pathology. The awards banquet for this honor will be Aug. 1 at the APS meeting in Pasadena, Calif. Mitchum will receive an engraved award and a $1,500…

Tomato, Heal Thyself

A better understanding of immune response could lead to better crops

Research has uncovered new regulations of defense pathways of plants. This could lead to helping crops fight off bacteria.