Latest Stories ⋅ Page 145

A Promising Plant Looks Even Better

Reputed to delay the wasting effects of HIV/AIDS, a medicinal plant goes into the next part of a clinical examination

A herbal remedy used by South African traditional healers to enhance immunity and slow the wasting of HIV/AIDS has passed the first part of a multi-part clinical study in that country. The next piece of the study, now beginning, will determine if anecdotal evidence of the plant’s benefits can be scientifically demonstrated.

A Bird’s Eye View

Research seeks to understand how the landscape influences bird movement and dispersal

One would think that Missouri’s birds fly wherever they want. Research is showing that resident jays, woodpeckers and cardinals are not so free, however. They stick close to a home forest and avoid flying over large areas of clear space.

Going Green on the Farm

An MU-directed project will help animal farmers buy efficient equipment, learn energy-saving techniques

Saving energy is a great way to reduce costs in agriculture operations. Upfront equipment expenditures or a lack of knowledge about best conversion practices can be obstacles to implementing improvements, however. To help Missouri animal farmers go green and save money, a team made up of the University of Missouri (MU), Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA), Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), the Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA), and EnSave, Inc., will partner to provide energy audits, loans, interest buy downs, rebates and grants to retrofit energy-saving equipment.

The Cottonwood Solution

MU agroforestry 'flood lab' research shows how trees can substitute for crops in flood-prone areas

Cottonwoods are among the fastest growing trees in North America and mature in as little as two years. They can be sold for biomass, rough-cut lumber for home framing and high-quality lumber for cabinets. Their short and fine cellulose fibers also make them an excellent paper source. Extracts from their fragrant buds are used in perfumes and cosmetics.

Model Green

Bradford Research Center develops and shares practical ways to save energy and money on the farm

From nearby Rangeline Road, Bradford Research and Extension Center, east of Columbia, looks like any other typical Missouri farm. The metal buildings and greenhouses, however, use only a fraction of the energy of similar structures. And these energy saving secrets are just a mouse click away for all to see.

Who Are the Tornado Tourists?

A research study seeks to understand a small but growing tourism niche

Like big game hunting guides giving tourists a glimpse of African lions, a growing group of commercial storm chasing companies are providing people from all over the world a close look at tornadoes. Gaining in popularity since the movie Twister in 1996, these tours have become a regular part of Tornado Alley, following super cell storms and hoping to see a tornado.

Want to Improve K-12 Education?

Serve Better Food, the Renegade Lunch Lady Says

Ann Cooper, a.k.a. the Renegade Lunch Lady, is the director of nutrition services for the Boulder Valley (California) School District and founder of the Food Family Farming Foundation. Her life’s work is to transform how American children are fed in school from commodity based and highly processed food to highly nutritious and wholesome substitutes that are also delicious.

Reproductive Scientist Sutovsky Earns Mizzou Entrepreneur of the Year Award

Peter Sutovsky, associate professor of reproductive physiology and animal science in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources with an appointment in the MU School of Medicine’s Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, was awarded the 2010 University of Missouri Faculty Entrepreneur of the Year Award.

Saving the Bats

A natural resources student gets caught up in a deadly bat disease that has come to Missouri

Kathryn Womack’s graduate studies at the University of Missouri School of Natural Resources into the habitats of bats is quickly going from an academic pursuit to one that may play a role in saving the nocturnal creatures from an epidemic.