Latest Stories ⋅ Page 144

Dean Tom Payne and Associate Dean Bryan Garton surprise Donna Vaught with an endowed scholarship in her name

More than 12,000 students have received scholarships during her 20-year tenure

Donna Vaught was in shock when Dean Tom Payne and Associate Dean Bryan Garton proclaimed that the College has established an endowed scholarship in her name. The announcement was made at the College’s Scholarship Donor Recognition Luncheon held Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010. The Donna J. Vaught Scholarship will be an unrestricted scholarship available to all students enrolled in the College.…

A Passion for the Creative

A CAFNR alum's love of filmmaking brings him to the 2010 Cannes Film Festival

The first time Drew Stewart saw his comedy sketch show on television, he couldn’t help but feel a rush. From the first word he wrote to the last frame he edited, Stewart was thrilled to have created something the public would see. What started as a hobby while at theCollege of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources soon became a passion that…

Post-Nuclear Adaptation

Plants grown near the Chernobyl nuclear disaster have adjusted to the radiation there

Scientists studying the ecological legacy of the 1986 nuclear disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power station have found surprising evidence that some plants can adapt and even flourish in a highly radioactive environment. An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of Missouri, grew flax plants in a high radiation environment near the abandoned Chernobyl site and compared the seeds produced to those from plants grown in non-radioactive control plots.

A Turf War on Bacteria?

Sports field tests at MU may curtail athlete infections

Student and professional athletes seem to get more and more serious infections from their bumps and bruises. Is it the grass? Scientists at the University of Missouri are testing different brands of artificial turf to study the effects of heat and bacterial growth on the surfaces, which are widely used on high school, college and professional sports fields.

Healthier Snacks through Improved Soybeans

A genetic change could reduce trans-fats in our favorite foods

A research team, led by plant scientists at the University of Missouri, has created a soybean variant that produces oil that does not have to be hydrogenated before going into food – adding no trans-fat.

Mission to Vietnam

MU Fulbright Scholar will help country develop its ecotourism potential

Mark Morgan, associate professor in the University of Missouri School of Natural Resources’ Parks, Recreation and Tourism program, has been selected as a Fulbright Scholar to teach a semester atVietnam National University and organize a study of one of the country’s national parks. “I’ll teach a graduate class in research methodology,” Morgan said. “The primary class assignment will be to conduct a visitor survey atCuc…

Hungry in Missouri

2010 Missouri Hunger Atlas shows food insecurity has worsened

One in four Missouri families with children worries about putting enough food on the table, according to the 2010 Missouri Hunger Atlas recently released by a team of University of Missouri researchers.

A Well Regarded Chip

University of Missouri researchers honored by USDA secretary

A cattle genomics consortium from the University of Missouri and USDA Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland has been awarded a 2010 U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary’s Honor Award.

A Promising Plant Looks Even Better

Reputed to delay the wasting effects of HIV/AIDS, a medicinal plant goes into the next part of a clinical examination

A herbal remedy used by South African traditional healers to enhance immunity and slow the wasting of HIV/AIDS has passed the first part of a multi-part clinical study in that country. The next piece of the study, now beginning, will determine if anecdotal evidence of the plant’s benefits can be scientifically demonstrated.

A Bird’s Eye View

Research seeks to understand how the landscape influences bird movement and dispersal

One would think that Missouri’s birds fly wherever they want. Research is showing that resident jays, woodpeckers and cardinals are not so free, however. They stick close to a home forest and avoid flying over large areas of clear space.