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Making a Difference and the News

Efforts to Rebuild a Damaged Reef Gains Attention of National TV

It’s hard enough for a scuba diving newcomer to plant coral seedlings in a seabed on the other side of the world. It is harder still when a NBC TV news camera follows your every move. During Winter Break, 15 MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources students spent three weeks studying conservation and biodiversity in Thailand.

A Promising Plant

CAFNR Research to Determine How Complementary and Traditional Medicines Can Alleviate HIV/AIDS

An international research center co-directed by William Folk, Ph.D., biochemist, in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources and the School of Medicine, will study the medical effectiveness of the plant commonly called Sutherlandia. A clinical study seeks to determine if the plant is safe and can benefit people in the early stages of HIV/AIDS.

A Small Piece of a Big Prize

MU Atmospheric Researcher Is One of Many Recipients of the 2007 Nobel Prize for Peace

Lupo, an associate professor of atmospheric science in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource’s Department of Soil, Environmental, and Atmospheric Sciences, is a contributing author and expert reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that shared the prize this summer with former vice president Al Gore, Jr.

A Recognition of “Intellectual Heft”

CAFNR Ranks High in Scholarly Productivity, Says National Higher Education Newspaper

The Chronicle of Higher Education’s third annual survey of scholarly productivity names University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources (CAFNR) faculty as being among the best in the nation. CAFNR Animal Science faculty ranked fifth most productive among its peer institutions. MU agriculture faculty overall ranked seventh.

Biting Discovery: MU Entomologist Finds Host of New Aquatic Insect Species in Thailand

“It’s much, much worse than a bee or wasp sting,” said Robert Sites, an entomologist in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at the University of Missouri-Columbia. “It’s actually not a sting; it’s a bite. You’ll be thinking about it a half hour or an hour. I was bitten in the pad of my little finger, and I felt intense pain all the way to my elbow for a good 30 minutes.” Working with researchers from universities in Thailand, Slovenia and the United States, Sites discovered more than 50 new insect species over a three-year period.

A Dazzling Approach to a Holiday Classic

Anyone Want a Polka-Dotted Poinsettia?

Polka-dotted poinsettias? Tiger-striped, creamy white with blue and red spots, blue and green stripes with gold glitter, or black tiger paws on gold leaves? Is this some wild experiment at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources? No, these unique holiday plants are the creations of CAFNR plant science students working in the College’s in-house floral shop called Tiger Garden. The poinsettias are individual works of art created to make a special season even more festive.

July Fourth beef grilling will cost more

The July Fourth holiday is the most popular grilling period of the year, and Americans will find the 191 million pounds of hamburgers and juicy steaks purchased will cost about 10 percent more than last year.

MU study looks at wildlife impact on city children

The future of wildlife conservation in the city depends on the next generation, but there is concern urban children may not be in touch with wildlife. With ethnic minority groups making up a large portion of city populations, a University of Missouri study looked at the experiences urban minority kids have with wildlife. According to the study, early involvement is important.

CAFNR alumnus Devisch named baron

Noel R. Devisch was recently honored for his service to European farmers and rural residents. He was granted the title of baron by Belgian royal decree on April 21, 2007. Devisch is a proud MU alumnus who stays in touch with his former professors and colleagues and has returned to MU to interact with students and faculty and share his…

MU Biological Engineers Build Capillary-Sized Laboratories

MU researchers are taking major strides toward the development of tiny, highly efficient liquid-core optical ring resonators (LCORR), or “lab-on-a-chip” sensors, which can perform multiple analyses at a high rate of speed with samples as small as a picoliter, or one-trillionth of a liter.