Latest Stories ⋅ Page 122

A Budding Campus Competition

Competitive Flower Arranging is a Way for Students to Test Their Skills, Have Fun

For the second year, students in Mary Ann Gowdy’s floral design class at the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources have ended their eight-week course by numbering-off into four-person teams to create the most attractive arrangement based on flowers, vases and accruements provided by Gowdy. Their final product goes on display on front of the Dean’s office in the Agriculture Building where faculty, staff, students and passers-by can vote on their favorite arrangement.

In Recognition of Leadership

The Ohio State University Recognizes Associate Dean Paul Vaughn

Paul R. Vaughn, associate dean for the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, was presented the 2008 Distinguished Alumni Award from The Ohio State University. Vaughn, who earned his Ph.D. in Agricultural Education there in 1976, was recognized for his leadership in academic programs at MU and his contribution in several national educational organizations, from the…

On a Bridge to Discovery

A Laboratory Benefitting Medicine and Agriculture Opens at MU

BridgeAt first glance, there seems to be little in common between biochemistry research in medicine and agriculture. On closer inspection, the relationship becomes profound as life and disease processes are very similar at the genetic and molecular level.

Helping the Buffalo Roam

CAFNR Student's Research Helps Determine If Weaning Techniques Harm Offspring

Once, buffalo roamed the American prairie in complex societies where offspring were raised and protected according to instinct and learned responses. Today’s descendants of these vast herds live on preserves under the care of wildlife managers.

Making a Difference and the News

Efforts to Rebuild a Damaged Reef Gains Attention of National TV

It’s hard enough for a scuba diving newcomer to plant coral seedlings in a seabed on the other side of the world. It is harder still when a NBC TV news camera follows your every move. During Winter Break, 15 MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources students spent three weeks studying conservation and biodiversity in Thailand.

A Promising Plant

CAFNR Research to Determine How Complementary and Traditional Medicines Can Alleviate HIV/AIDS

An international research center co-directed by William Folk, Ph.D., biochemist, in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources and the School of Medicine, will study the medical effectiveness of the plant commonly called Sutherlandia. A clinical study seeks to determine if the plant is safe and can benefit people in the early stages of HIV/AIDS.

A Small Piece of a Big Prize

MU Atmospheric Researcher Is One of Many Recipients of the 2007 Nobel Prize for Peace

Lupo, an associate professor of atmospheric science in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource’s Department of Soil, Environmental, and Atmospheric Sciences, is a contributing author and expert reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that shared the prize this summer with former vice president Al Gore, Jr.

A Recognition of “Intellectual Heft”

CAFNR Ranks High in Scholarly Productivity, Says National Higher Education Newspaper

The Chronicle of Higher Education’s third annual survey of scholarly productivity names University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources (CAFNR) faculty as being among the best in the nation. CAFNR Animal Science faculty ranked fifth most productive among its peer institutions. MU agriculture faculty overall ranked seventh.

Biting Discovery: MU Entomologist Finds Host of New Aquatic Insect Species in Thailand

“It’s much, much worse than a bee or wasp sting,” said Robert Sites, an entomologist in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at the University of Missouri-Columbia. “It’s actually not a sting; it’s a bite. You’ll be thinking about it a half hour or an hour. I was bitten in the pad of my little finger, and I felt intense pain all the way to my elbow for a good 30 minutes.” Working with researchers from universities in Thailand, Slovenia and the United States, Sites discovered more than 50 new insect species over a three-year period.

A Dazzling Approach to a Holiday Classic

Anyone Want a Polka-Dotted Poinsettia?

Polka-dotted poinsettias? Tiger-striped, creamy white with blue and red spots, blue and green stripes with gold glitter, or black tiger paws on gold leaves? Is this some wild experiment at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources? No, these unique holiday plants are the creations of CAFNR plant science students working in the College’s in-house floral shop called Tiger Garden. The poinsettias are individual works of art created to make a special season even more festive.