Soil Environmental & Atmospheric Sciences ⋅ Page 9

A Drought Five Feet Under

A short but significant dry spell has left Missouri soil nearly desiccated

Missouri has not escaped the historic drought that has devastated Texas, Oklahoma and Arizona. A short but critically-timed dry spell has left much of the state’s soil bone dry down to five feet. Unless there is long and heavy rain and snowfall this winter, Missouri’s most important crops will suffer.

Closing the loop

From food waste to compost to fresh vegetables, an innovative recycling program launches at Bradford Research Center

Tim Reinbott, superintendent of Bradford Research Center, is creating a closed-loop system that doesn’t require a single ounce of fossil fuel—once all the components are operational. Reinbott’s “Zero Carbon Footprint Vegetable and Compost Production System” can become a model for other universities, school districts, prisons and even small communities who aspire to turn their waste stream into a productive resource.

Another Bad Winter

A strong La Nina may make this winter a "blockfest"

Tony Lupo, department chair and professor of MU atmospheric science, says the same La Niña, jet stream and atmospheric blocking patterns that brought heavy snows and below normal temperatures to the central states will probably remain in place for the winter of 2011-2012.

Midwest’s Perfect Storm

Atmospheric scientists use history and modern meteorology to detail the cause and damage of the 11/11/11 weather disaster

One hundred years ago this Nov. 11, probably the most sudden and dangerous cold blast in American history occurred. Patrick Market and a student team in MU atmospheric sciences have studied the science and devastation of the Great Blue Norther of 11/11/11.

Award Winning Forecast

SNR graduate recognized for warning Joplin before tornado

Eric Wise, SNR Class of 2002 and weather forecaster for the National Weather Service in Springfield, Mo., was awarded the Operational Achievement Individual Award by the National Weather Association for his expert analysis that provided more than 20 minutes of warning time for the city devastated by an EF-5 rated tornado on May 22, 2011.

A Global Weather Partnership

Missouri and Russian scientists partner to study atmospheric blocking

University of Missouri atmospheric science researchers will team with their counterparts at the A.M.Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in a three million Russian ruble project to study the phenomena of atmospheric blocking.

Fighting on the Weather Front

MU meteorologists create a Civil War forecast 150 years back in time

One hundred fifty years ago, two armies battled each other and the weather in Missouri’s first significant Civil War battle. While the battle’s course is familiar to historians, virtually no scientific data is known about the atmospheric conditions that influenced the fighting.

After the Deluge

Flooded farmlands in southeast Missouri are too important not to restore

The Mississippi River region that was flooded when the Army Corps of Engineers blew a two-mile hole on the 35-mile-long Bird’s Point-New Madrid floodway is too economically important not to restore to agricultural use, said a University of Missouri professor who conducts soil and crop research in the area.

A Calmer Tornado Alley

Climate phenomenon may push super-cell thunderstorms to northern plains

Tornado Alley, the swath of prairie from Texas through Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri famous for twisters, may see a largely calm tornado season this year.

Greater Yields, Fewer Emissions

New farming method reduces nitrous oxide greenhouse gases

Can farmers reduce a gas thought to contribute to global warming and increase production simply by adopting a new tillage practice? A research agronomist at the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources thinks he has found the way.