Soil Environmental & Atmospheric Sciences ⋅ Page 10

Getting the Lead Out

A military surveillance system helps find heavy metal contamination

Almost 200 years of lead mining and smelting in southeastern Missouri has left a contamination legacy that is still largely unmeasured. To accurately quantify the environmental impact, a team of University of Missouri resource assessment experts and state and federal agencies is using a high-tech military search tool to quickly and cheaply find the pollution.

Who Are the Tornado Tourists?

A research study seeks to understand a small but growing tourism niche

Like big game hunting guides giving tourists a glimpse of African lions, a growing group of commercial storm chasing companies are providing people from all over the world a close look at tornadoes. Gaining in popularity since the movie Twister in 1996, these tours have become a regular part of Tornado Alley, following super cell storms and hoping to see a tornado.

Agricultural Time Capsule

Predicting the effects of biofuel production by mining 120 years of agriculture research

Randall Miles, associate professor of soil science at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, is part of an international consortium of scientists assessing and predicting these effects before biomass planting and harvesting is initiated. Unfortunately, they don’t have decades to set up experiments and gather data.

Civil War Weather Detectives

Analyzing a rain shower that may have helped keep Missouri in the Union

A meteorology student at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources wants to plug this gap in the historical record. With guidance from the MU head of atmospheric science, he has become a weather detective, pulling together odd bits of meteorological flotsam from all over the world to compile a Missouri weather forecast almost 150 years backward in time.

A Stormy Forecast

Spring Storm Season May be unusually Active, Says MU Atmospheric Sciences Researcher

The upcoming storm season could be more active than usual in Tornado Alley, according to a University of Missouri atmospheric sciences professor. Tony Lupo, department chair and professor of MU atmospheric science, said that the upcoming weather pattern resembles that of the turbulent 2002-2003 season when 109 tornadoes swept across Missouri – one of the worst seasons on record. Then,…

Understanding a Weather Stop Sign in the Sky

An MU-Russia team partners to determine how a warming climate may influence atmospheric blocking

In December and January, a lingering snowy and cold snap engulfed much of America. While previous storms steadily moved over the country and out to sea, leaving moderate weather behind, this period of harsh winter weather came and stayed for weeks and plunged as far south as Texas. The frigid and stagnant weather pattern confused many, but it didn’t surprise…

Seeing Green

New technology at MU's Delta Research Center has the potential to keep money in farmers' pockets and help protect the environment

University of Missouri scientists have played a key role in developing new technology that takes the guesswork out of deciding how much nitrogen to apply to crops. The technology has the potential to keep money in farmers’ pockets and help protect the environment.

Ready for the storm

Campus Weather Service helps make MU "storm ready"

Students in the Department of Soils, Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences are working to make MU the first university in mid-Missouri to become certified as “storm ready” by the National Weather Service (NWS).

Chasing Thundersnow

MU researchers release weather balloons during winter storms

Everyone is familiar with storm chasers who follow tornadoes during the summer months. One University of Missouri researcher and a team of students will be doing much the same thing this winter in search of a rare weather phenomenon called thundersnow. The research could make the prediction of such severe snowfall events more accurate.

Wind farms generate power, revenue, say MU Extension specialists

University of Missouri Extension specialists say that there are excellent opportunities for sustainable wind power in northwest Missouri. Four wind turbines supply all the electricity for the small town of Rock Port in Atchison County. The city of just over 1,300 residents is the first in the United States to operate solely on wind power.