School of Natural Resources ⋅ Page 22

The Cottonwood Solution

MU agroforestry 'flood lab' research shows how trees can substitute for crops in flood-prone areas

Cottonwoods are among the fastest growing trees in North America and mature in as little as two years. They can be sold for biomass, rough-cut lumber for home framing and high-quality lumber for cabinets. Their short and fine cellulose fibers also make them an excellent paper source. Extracts from their fragrant buds are used in perfumes and cosmetics.

Who Are the Tornado Tourists?

A research study seeks to understand a small but growing tourism niche

Like big game hunting guides giving tourists a glimpse of African lions, a growing group of commercial storm chasing companies are providing people from all over the world a close look at tornadoes. Gaining in popularity since the movie Twister in 1996, these tours have become a regular part of Tornado Alley, following super cell storms and hoping to see a tornado.

Saving the Bats

A natural resources student gets caught up in a deadly bat disease that has come to Missouri

Kathryn Womack’s graduate studies at the University of Missouri School of Natural Resources into the habitats of bats is quickly going from an academic pursuit to one that may play a role in saving the nocturnal creatures from an epidemic.

Agricultural Time Capsule

Predicting the effects of biofuel production by mining 120 years of agriculture research

Randall Miles, associate professor of soil science at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, is part of an international consortium of scientists assessing and predicting these effects before biomass planting and harvesting is initiated. Unfortunately, they don’t have decades to set up experiments and gather data.

Civil War Weather Detectives

Analyzing a rain shower that may have helped keep Missouri in the Union

A meteorology student at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources wants to plug this gap in the historical record. With guidance from the MU head of atmospheric science, he has become a weather detective, pulling together odd bits of meteorological flotsam from all over the world to compile a Missouri weather forecast almost 150 years backward in time.

A Non-Flying Office Addition

David Vaught is presented a new, but earth-bound trophy

Vaught, chair and director of graduate studies for the University of Missouri School of Natural Resources’ Parks, Recreation and Tourism department, was recognized in early March.

A Stormy Forecast

Spring Storm Season May be unusually Active, Says MU Atmospheric Sciences Researcher

The upcoming storm season could be more active than usual in Tornado Alley, according to a University of Missouri atmospheric sciences professor. Tony Lupo, department chair and professor of MU atmospheric science, said that the upcoming weather pattern resembles that of the turbulent 2002-2003 season when 109 tornadoes swept across Missouri – one of the worst seasons on record. Then,…

Easter Eggs? Check. Candy? Check. Flashlight? Check.

MU Parks, Recreation and Tourism students get practical experience at planning a big event

On March 25, children from Columbia will search for candy-stuffed Easter eggs after the sun goes down in the 2nd Annual Flashlight Easter Egg Hunt. This fun outing not only gives the kids something to look forward to, but it gives the MU Parks, Recreation and Tourism students the chance to give back to the community. In 2009, the City…

Understanding a Weather Stop Sign in the Sky

An MU-Russia team partners to determine how a warming climate may influence atmospheric blocking

In December and January, a lingering snowy and cold snap engulfed much of America. While previous storms steadily moved over the country and out to sea, leaving moderate weather behind, this period of harsh winter weather came and stayed for weeks and plunged as far south as Texas. The frigid and stagnant weather pattern confused many, but it didn’t surprise…

Green wood

CAFNR professor researches environmentally certified forest products

Everyone is in favor of going green. But how much more will the average consumer pay to help the environment? Francisco Aguilar, assistant professor in forestry at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, is finding out.