Plant Sciences ⋅ Page 33

Growing rice where it has never been grown before

A Missouri research program may help better feed an increasingly hungry world

In an unexpected place, the Bootheel of Missouri, a research program that could increase rice production began just as the world was reading the shortage news. Using a system of watering familiar to Midwestern farmers, center-pivot irrigation, the study is looking to grow rice on land where it cannot now be planted. If successful, the project could significantly increase rice production.

Trimming and Fertilizing History

Alumni and Horticulturalists Work to Save a Historic Missouri Bur Oak

A survivor of uncounted tornadoes and lightning strikes, the 90-ft. tall, 91-inch wide tree was stressed. Probably the second largest bur oak in the nation, the soil around it has been compacted by cars and some of its dead limbs were infested with wood decay that threatened the other branches and trunk.

Making a Difference and the News

Efforts to Rebuild a Damaged Reef Gains Attention of National TV

It’s hard enough for a scuba diving newcomer to plant coral seedlings in a seabed on the other side of the world. It is harder still when a NBC TV news camera follows your every move. During Winter Break, 15 MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources students spent three weeks studying conservation and biodiversity in Thailand.

A Dazzling Approach to a Holiday Classic

Anyone Want a Polka-Dotted Poinsettia?

Polka-dotted poinsettias? Tiger-striped, creamy white with blue and red spots, blue and green stripes with gold glitter, or black tiger paws on gold leaves? Is this some wild experiment at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources? No, these unique holiday plants are the creations of CAFNR plant science students working in the College’s in-house floral shop called Tiger Garden. The poinsettias are individual works of art created to make a special season even more festive.