Plant Sciences ⋅ Page 25

Raymond Schroeder, 1912-2010

The father of MU employee benefits and friend to horticulture passes

Raymond Schroeder, known as the chief architect of University of Missouri benefits, passed away in Feb. 12, 2010 at the age of 97. At the time of his retirement in 1982, he had been a member of the faculty of the University of Missouri Department of Horticulture for 48 years. He served as its chairman for 27 years. All University…

Soybean Hero

Henry Nguyen elected as AAAS fellow

Henry Nguyen, director of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at the University of Missouri, was recently elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Nguyen was honored for his distinguished research contributions in plant genetics and genomics, and his leadership in plant abiotic stress, most notably in drought tolerance. AAAS fellows are elected annually for…

MU Plant Science corn research published in Science magazine

Two University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources faculty members’ work has been showcased in Science. Published in the journal’s August issue, the co-authors’ two articles describe a massive genetic resource geneticists and breeders can use to unlock the basis of corn diversity.

A Dry Subject

CAFNR researchers study the effects of drought by making their own

Researchers in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources (CAFNR) recently received a $1,558,125 grant to construct drought simulators that enable the scientists to study how reduced water availability affects plants and crop productivity.

Finding a stronger soybean

New National Science Foundation grant focuses on resistance genes in soybean

In Missouri, where soybeans reign as the number one cash crop, soybean pathogens can cut yields and impact the state’s economy. A research effort to identify the genes essential for a strong plant defense against three diseases got a boost recently with a new $2.1 million grant by the National Science Foundation to Iowa State University and the University of Missouri.

Tiger Garden: Following flowers

Kim Cottrell's initial career goal was in architecture. Work at MU's Tiger Garden helped to discover her real passion.

“I quickly found the architecture studies program was not for me,” the senior from Monticello said. “I decided to pursue my landscape architecture passions through the plant science landscape design program. It was not a hard switch. The College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources was so welcoming, and the advisers were very helpful.”

A very special grape

MU researchers use Norton grape to understand innate immune systems of grapevines against fungal pathogens

When it comes to wine, the Norton grape has its admirers. But qualities other than taste are bringing Missouri’s state grape to the attention of science. University of Missouri researchers, together with scientists at Missouri State University and the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis, are investigating the genes that make Norton grapes resistant to fungal pathogens that can plague other varieties of wine grapes.

MU faculty earn funding through the Missouri Life Sciences Research Trust Fund

Seven Missouri researchers recently received funding through the Missouri Life Sciences Research Trust Fund. Six of the researchers are from the University of Missouri—of these, three are from the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. The grants total $5,525,785.

A promising new way to grow rice

A research program succeeds in spite of a passing hurricane

Despite being battered by the remnants of Hurricane Ike, an experiment to grow rice under center-pivot sprinkler irrigation yielded as much or more of the grain as conventional methods. This new technique may allow farmers to produce the crop in areas where it cannot be grown now, helping produce more food for a hungry world.

Growing rice where it has never been grown before

A Missouri research program may help better feed an increasingly hungry world

In an unexpected place, the Bootheel of Missouri, a research program that could increase rice production began just as the world was reading the shortage news. Using a system of watering familiar to Midwestern farmers, center-pivot irrigation, the study is looking to grow rice on land where it cannot now be planted. If successful, the project could significantly increase rice production.