Food Systems and Bioengineering ⋅ Page 19

Helping astronauts live in space

A 2004 bioengineering graduate describes life at NASA

How do you fight a fire on the International Space Station orbiting 200 miles above the surface of the earth? What do astronauts do to adjust the thermostat when one side of the Station is boiling in the heat of the sun and the other, in darkness, is almost absolute zero? Training astronauts in these techniques is the job of Felicity Pino, NASA International Space Station environmental control and life support systems instructor and graduate of the MU biological engineering program.

MU faculty earn funding through the Missouri Life Sciences Research Trust Fund

Seven Missouri researchers recently received funding through the Missouri Life Sciences Research Trust Fund. Six of the researchers are from the University of Missouri—of these, three are from the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. The grants total $5,525,785.

Friendly bacteria help with healthy soy diet

First soy bar to add probiotics eases common intestinal problems

Soy is considered a healthy addition to a diet, but sometimes it is not easy on the stomach. Now, a University of Missouri researcher believes she has the answer: freeze-dried probiotic microcapsules.

MU chef kicks things up a notch aboard ship

Life aboard a U.S. Navy ship can be grueling with deployments of up to eight months at sea. A great meal can help make life better for the sailors.Greg Chase, a 2007 graduate from the MU Hotel and Restaurant Management (HRM) program and former sous chef for the Walt Disney World Resort Polynesian Resort in Orlando, stepped in to support.

The recipe for success and fun in the kitchen

Two celebrity chefs share their enthusiasm for Midwestern cuisine

If there is a basic ingredient for success in the kitchen, the Kelly Twins say it is hard work, a fun attitude and a good education.

James Groves Wins Technology Award

James Groves, CAFNR hotel and restaurant management chair and associate professor, has won the University of Missouri 2008 Excellence in Teaching with Technology Award in the Undergraduate Teaching Category.

MU Biological Engineers Build Capillary-Sized Laboratories

MU researchers are taking major strides toward the development of tiny, highly efficient liquid-core optical ring resonators (LCORR), or “lab-on-a-chip” sensors, which can perform multiple analyses at a high rate of speed with samples as small as a picoliter, or one-trillionth of a liter.