Bond Life Sciences Center ⋅ Page 1

Fighting a Financially Taxing Pathogen

Researchers at MU and the University of Georgia published a paper related to an underutilized source of resistance in the soybean genotype Peking

A unique collaboration between plant biologists and biochemists is looking to tackle the most financially taxing pathogen in the soybean industry. Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most detrimental and costly pathogen affecting soybean production in the United States, with more than $1 billion lost annually due to SCN infection. Management of this pathogen relies on the use of SCN-resistant…

CAFNR Faculty Part of Approximately $11 Million in Funds from UM System, Mizzou Following Strategic Research Investment

The University of Missouri System has announced $20.5 million in awards for its first round of research funding to address grand challenges, foster system-wide collaboration and enhance faculty research through new equipment. This is part of the System’s plan to strategically invest $50 million in research and creative works over the next five years, announced last fall. Researchers from CAFNR…

Gary Stacey Receives 2019 President’s Award for Sustained Career Excellence

Gary Stacey, Curator’s Distinguished Professor of Plant Sciences and investigator at the Bond Life Sciences Center, has received the 2019 President’s Award for Sustained Career Excellence. Each year, the UM System President’s Awards are presented on behalf of President Mun Choi to faculty members across the four campuses of the UM System. These highly competitive awards recognize faculty who have made exceptional…

Building a Bridge to Success

MU and Danforth Center collaborative agreement showcases Missouri's plant biology strength

It was four years ago when the University of Missouri and the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center entered into a collaborative agreement that would lead to the hiring of four new researchers, each of whom would enhance the plant biology research not only in the state, but also across the globe. Three of those positions are now filled, with the…

A Humbling Recognition

Jon Cody wins J. Perry Gustafson Award for Outstanding Graduate Research

Teaching and research have been at the forefront of J. Perry Gustafson’s distinguished 40-plus-year career. It makes perfect sense, then, that the J. Perry Gustafson Award for Outstanding Graduate Research in the Life Sciences would be awarded to a stellar Ph.D. student whose quality research deserves wide recognition. Jon Cody, a graduate student in the Division of Biological Sciences, earned…

Battling an Unseen Pest

Melissa Mitchum has devoted her career to researching soybean cyst nematodes

One of the greatest threats to crops lives underground and can’t be seen by the naked eye. Plant parasitic nematodes are microscopic roundworms that range in size from as small as 250 micrometers, or 0.0098 inches, to a maximum of several millimeters in length. It’s a parasite that Melissa Mitchum has devoted her career to fighting. Mitchum, a professor in…

A Global Affair

MU to host 10th International Conference on Pig Reproduction June 11-14

The top experts of the in the field of pig reproductive physiology will gather on the University of Missouri campus from June 11-14 for the 10th installment of the International Conference on Pig Reproduction (ICPR). “This meeting really brings the research, extension and industry components all together so you can see the spectrum,” Randy Prather said. “You can see what’s…

‘World-Class Players’

Trio of MU Biochemistry researchers serve as chairs at prestigious Gordon Research Conferences, Seminars

Two faculty members from the University of Missouri’s Division of Biochemistry – as well as a Ph.D. student – were chosen to serve as co-chairs for meetings of the Gordon Research Conferences (GRC) and Gordon Research Seminars (GRS). In 2013, GRC attendees at the salivary gland and exocrine biology meeting voted that Gary Weisman, Curators Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry, should serve…

Taking Root

New grass finding may reduce nitrogen amounts needed for farming

As farmers spend billions of dollars spreading nitrogen on their fields this spring, researchers at the University of Missouri are working toward less reliance on the fertilizer. Less dependence on nitrogen could start with a simple type of grass, Setaria viridis, and its relationship with bacteria. The plant promises to lay groundwork for scientists exploring the relationship between crops and…

Filling in the Gaps of HIV

Biochemist helps discover major protein in deadly virus

Seeing the whole picture can mean a lot when it comes to figuring out HIV. Researchers at the University of Missouri Bond Life Sciences Center are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain the flexible protein’s vital role in the virus life cycle. The protein the researchers imaged is a building…