Bioengineering ⋅ Page 3

Toning Down the Smell

New computer models help concentrated
animal producers improve air quality

Teng Teeh Lim recently received a $50,000 Mizzou Advantage grant to develop a computer model that allows large producers to use the size and other simple information about their swine or dairy farm to give them a better idea of the amount of emissions and what they can do to address odor or emission issues.

Infection, Not Inflammation

An experimental animal model provides clues to better therapies for cystic fibrosis patients

Aided by a new experimental model, scientists are a step closer to understanding how cystic fibrosis (CF) causes lung disease in people with the condition. The findings, published online April 28 in the journal Science Translational Medicine, could help improve treatments for lung disease, which causes most of the deaths and disability among people with CF.

Viator Earns Mizzou Award for Undergraduate Advising

John Viator, assistant professor of biological engineering at the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, was awarded the Outstanding Undergraduate Mentor Award at the University of Missouri Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum on April 27. The award, given by the Office of Undergraduate Research, recognizes faculty members who support and promote undergraduate research and creative and scholarly achievements.…

Helping astronauts live in space

A 2004 bioengineering graduate describes life at NASA

How do you fight a fire on the International Space Station orbiting 200 miles above the surface of the earth? What do astronauts do to adjust the thermostat when one side of the Station is boiling in the heat of the sun and the other, in darkness, is almost absolute zero? Training astronauts in these techniques is the job of Felicity Pino, NASA International Space Station environmental control and life support systems instructor and graduate of the MU biological engineering program.

MU faculty earn funding through the Missouri Life Sciences Research Trust Fund

Seven Missouri researchers recently received funding through the Missouri Life Sciences Research Trust Fund. Six of the researchers are from the University of Missouri—of these, three are from the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. The grants total $5,525,785.

MU Biological Engineers Build Capillary-Sized Laboratories

MU researchers are taking major strides toward the development of tiny, highly efficient liquid-core optical ring resonators (LCORR), or “lab-on-a-chip” sensors, which can perform multiple analyses at a high rate of speed with samples as small as a picoliter, or one-trillionth of a liter.