April 11, 2019 – Reynolds Alumni Ctr.

2008 Outstanding Teacher: Patrick Market

Patrick Market

PATRICK MARKET, associate professor of atmospheric sciences, not only enjoys the admiration of his students, but colleagues as well. Market came to MU in 1999 to teach courses in Synoptic Meteorology and conduct research on the dynamics of weather systems that generate heavy rainfall and snowfall.

"I was a student of Dr. Market from 2000 to 2004," said Rebecca Cripe, who now works as an environmental scientist for the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. "His enthusiasm and passion for the subject was invigorating. I looked forward to class every day. He not only taught the subject, but gave his students opportunities to participate in class that other instructors did not."


"I SAT IN ON HIS CLASSES IN ORDER TO REVIEW HIS TEACHING FOR PROMOTION AND TENURE. I FOUND HIS TEACHING IS EXCELLENT. HE TEACHES ENTHUSIASTICALLY AND THE STUDENTS PAY CLOSE ATTENTION. HE ENGAGES THEM BY FREQUENTLY ASKING QUESTIONS. HE’S NOT AFRAID TO CHANGE HIS DAY’S PLAN AND GET THE STUDENTS ON THE COMPUTERS TO EXAMINE A RELEVANT WEATHER FORECAST ISSUE."

— Tony Lupo, associate professor


Market received a Gold Chalk Award in 2006 from the Graduate Professional Council and is a member of the CAFNR Teaching Academy. In 2005 and 2006, he was also chosen by students in the School of Natural Resources to receive the Outstanding Faculty Award.

On the national level, Market was the only academic person invited to contribute training materials to the new National Weather Service Advanced Warning Operations Course on Winter Weather. This course is required by nearly all 3,000 weather forecasters in the service. With two other authors, Market wrote a case studies meteorology textbook in 2007. He has authored 32 refereed journals since 1999 and has received more than $550,000 in grant funding.

Market has a strong research program with recent emphasis on snowstorms that feature lightning and thunder ("thundersnow"). He was awarded a National Science Foundation Career Award for his work on convective snow in the central U.S."I owe quite a bit to Dr. Market," said Christina Crowe, graduate research assistant in atmospheric sciences at the University of Alabama-Huntsville. "I would not be the graduate student that I am without his guidance, both then and now. I know that I am not alone."