Research ⋅ Page 23

Living pots

Biodegradable planting pots mean healthier veggies and environment

Starting this growing season the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources’ teaching greenhouses and in-house florist shop, Tiger Garden, will use 100 percent biodegradable pots to grow tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, cucumbers, melons and herbs.

Tastier meat and profits?

A new chip identifies important bovine genomic traits

With help from a new genetic device recently unveiled by a team of animal science researchers, animal breeders may soon be building betters cows that produce more and better beef and tastier profits.

Finding a stronger soybean

New National Science Foundation grant focuses on resistance genes in soybean

In Missouri, where soybeans reign as the number one cash crop, soybean pathogens can cut yields and impact the state’s economy. A research effort to identify the genes essential for a strong plant defense against three diseases got a boost recently with a new $2.1 million grant by the National Science Foundation to Iowa State University and the University of Missouri.

Off-hours crime fighter

By day, he studies reproductive efficiency of farm animals, by night, he invents ways to link felons with their victims

In his daytime job as part of the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Animal Sciences faculty, Peter Sutovsky studies mammalian spermatogenesis, fertilization and pre-implantation embryonic development. In his off-hours, he helps detectives solve criminal cases. The associate professor is a member of a joint venture between the University of Missouri and the Paternity Testing Corp. (PTC) that seeks to revolutionize forensic work relating to rape cases.

Chasing Thundersnow

MU researchers release weather balloons during winter storms

Everyone is familiar with storm chasers who follow tornadoes during the summer months. One University of Missouri researcher and a team of students will be doing much the same thing this winter in search of a rare weather phenomenon called thundersnow. The research could make the prediction of such severe snowfall events more accurate.

A very special grape

MU researchers use Norton grape to understand innate immune systems of grapevines against fungal pathogens

When it comes to wine, the Norton grape has its admirers. But qualities other than taste are bringing Missouri’s state grape to the attention of science. University of Missouri researchers, together with scientists at Missouri State University and the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis, are investigating the genes that make Norton grapes resistant to fungal pathogens that can plague other varieties of wine grapes.

MU faculty earn funding through the Missouri Life Sciences Research Trust Fund

Seven Missouri researchers recently received funding through the Missouri Life Sciences Research Trust Fund. Six of the researchers are from the University of Missouri—of these, three are from the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. The grants total $5,525,785.

Taking a bite out of cattle feed costs

MU Southwest Center researchers identify genetics that make a more efficient cow

Escalating feed and fertilizer prices have eroded profitability in the beef industry nationwide. With over 54,000 beef operations and the second largest beef herd in the U.S., Missouri stands to lose a lot. Researchers at University of Missouri’s Southwest Center near Mt. Vernon, Mo., have found how many pounds a cow gains per pound of feed consumed varies between animals.

A promising new way to grow rice

A research program succeeds in spite of a passing hurricane

Despite being battered by the remnants of Hurricane Ike, an experiment to grow rice under center-pivot sprinkler irrigation yielded as much or more of the grain as conventional methods. This new technique may allow farmers to produce the crop in areas where it cannot be grown now, helping produce more food for a hungry world.

Friendly bacteria help with healthy soy diet

First soy bar to add probiotics eases common intestinal problems

Soy is considered a healthy addition to a diet, but sometimes it is not easy on the stomach. Now, a University of Missouri researcher believes she has the answer: freeze-dried probiotic microcapsules.