Key Message Areas ⋅ Page 41

An Unorthodox Road to a Golden Apple

Award recipient Linda Sowers experience includes golf and chemical sales

The road to a teaching position at a research university seldom strays from a traditional route of degrees and years of experience in the classroom. Linda Sowers, an instructor of agricultural journalism, agriculture and applied economics at the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, took a very different course to the classroom that included chemical sales, marketing, golf…

Executive in Residence: Bill Buckner

Mizzou makes it worth coming home. Bill Buckner, BS, Ag Econ ’79, came home to Missouri November 12-15 as the 36th Reich Family Executive-in-Residence. Buckner is the CEO and president of Bayer CropScience, LP, and grew up on a farm in Mexico, Mo. Since he graduated from CAFNR, he has moved across the country and around the world to places…

Safer Turkey Dinners

A new test will better identify salmonella-contaminated poultry and eggs

Food scientists at the University of Missouri have developed a faster and more accurate way to test poultry and eggs for live salmonella contamination. The DNA-based process provides results in as little as 2-5 hours versus up to five days for current testing techniques that culture samples in a Petri dish. The technique can allow the poultry industry to test for contamination before product is shipped, thus avoiding costly recalls.

A Room and a Thank You

The Gathering Place B and B honors veterans in nationwide project

Two Missouri military veterans received a free stay at the Gathering Place Bed and Breakfast in Columbia as part of a nationwide project to thank former and current personnel for their service.

A Treat for the Instructor, Not a Horse

A Golden Apple Award goes to Marci Crosby

Horses love apples. Equine teachers like them, too, especially when they are golden. Marci Crosby, equine instructor at the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri, was presented a Golden Apple Award this October for her contributions to students both in and out of class. “Marci not only teaches, but also manages the horse facilities and program…

Remembering a Native Son

Gift to CAFNR honors Jerry Litton, class of '61

Jerry Litton, who tragically died in an aircraft accident in 1976 after winning a Democratic primary bid for United States Senator, will be honored by the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri, his alma mater.

CAFNR Honors Legacy of a Champion for Student Financial Aid

Allan Purdy, who dedicated his life to removing financial barriers to higher education, died Oct. 14, 2010 after suffering a stroke. He was 96. “With the passing of Allan Purdy, the financial aid community and students lose an irreplaceable advocate for college access and success,” said National Association of Student Financial Aid Administration President Justin Draeger. “Purdy was a pioneer…

Dean Tom Payne and Associate Dean Bryan Garton surprise Donna Vaught with an endowed scholarship in her name

More than 12,000 students have received scholarships during her 20-year tenure

Donna Vaught was in shock when Dean Tom Payne and Associate Dean Bryan Garton proclaimed that the College has established an endowed scholarship in her name. The announcement was made at the College’s Scholarship Donor Recognition Luncheon held Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010. The Donna J. Vaught Scholarship will be an unrestricted scholarship available to all students enrolled in the College.…

Post-Nuclear Adaptation

Plants grown near the Chernobyl nuclear disaster have adjusted to the radiation there

Scientists studying the ecological legacy of the 1986 nuclear disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power station have found surprising evidence that some plants can adapt and even flourish in a highly radioactive environment. An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of Missouri, grew flax plants in a high radiation environment near the abandoned Chernobyl site and compared the seeds produced to those from plants grown in non-radioactive control plots.

A Turf War on Bacteria?

Sports field tests at MU may curtail athlete infections

Student and professional athletes seem to get more and more serious infections from their bumps and bruises. Is it the grass? Scientists at the University of Missouri are testing different brands of artificial turf to study the effects of heat and bacterial growth on the surfaces, which are widely used on high school, college and professional sports fields.