Innovative Thinking ⋅ Page 11

Flavor Release Ice Cream

Don't like the taste? Wait a second

Elizabeth Fenner, a food science graduate student at the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, is finishing testing of an experimental ice cream that starts as one flavor then shifts to another before being swallowed.

No Drop in the Bucket

Drought simulators study effects of reduced water on crops

Two drought simulators designed to test the effects of water deficiency on crops are now operational at the University of Missouri’s Bradford Research and Extension Center east of Columbia. The simulators are part of a $1,558,125 Missouri Life Sciences Research Board grant to study how reduced water availability affects plants and crop productivity, and how new breeds of drought-tolerant plants can boost yields.

Handling the Heat

The heat is on. With temperatures in the high 90s and heat indexes in the triple digits, the next several days could pose significant risks to mid-Missouri livestock. According to USDA data, Missouri ranks ninth in the nation in cattle and beef sales earning more than $370 million in 2010, and its dairy industry has made a significant comeback in…

Reading the Leaves

MU center will see if certain herbal medicines really work

Dennis Lubahn, center director and project leader of the prostate cancer study, is leading a team of 21 MU researchers whose expertise ranges from agronomy to the diseases of laboratory animals. The team will take an interdisciplinary research approach utilizing the unique range of backgrounds and skills on MU’s Columbia campus and the Missouri Botanical Garden in St Louis. The research was made possible by the NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicines, the Office of Dietary Supplements and the National Cancer Institute.

More Breakfast, Less Overeating

Science now supports what your mom said about meal skipping in the morning

Mom always told you to eat a good breakfast. Now there’s research proof from the University of Missouri that that teens who eat a healthy breakfast, particularly one rich in protein, can curb their appetite and prevent overeating later in the day. This could make breakfast a successful dietary strategy to help regulate food intake.

Interrupting a Disease Process

A plant oil reduces the harmful early effects of obesity

Obesity changes a person’s glucose and fat metabolism, leading to insulin resistance that triggers chronic diseases like Type 2 Diabetes and cardiovascular illness. James Perfield, assistant professor at the University of Missouri specializing in nutrition and the physiology of metabolic diseases, has identified a plant oil that seems to interrupt the development of obesity-triggered insulin resistance.

Healthier and More Efficient Cows

MU team studies feed efficiency and participates in respiratory disease study

With the help of two grants totaling more than $14 million from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, research teams led by the University of Missouri and Texas A&M University will focus on developing methodologies to breed cattle that more efficiently utilize feed and that are more resistant to Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD).

A Better Bean

CAFNR investigates how to market new seed technologies to farmers

The University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources will investigate the economic impacts and best marketing strategies of new soybean seed technologies designed to improve US production.

From Trash Tree to Disease Fighter

A nuisance tree in Missouri may yield a new MRSA treatment

A team of scientists from disparate disciplines at the University of Missouri have found preliminary evidence that a compound from a nuisance tree that hinders farming could be a new anti-microbial agent effective against a dangerous infection plaguing hospitals.

Greater Yields, Fewer Emissions

New farming method reduces nitrous oxide greenhouse gases

Can farmers reduce a gas thought to contribute to global warming and increase production simply by adopting a new tillage practice? A research agronomist at the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources thinks he has found the way.