Agroforestry Workshop to Focus on Management

Glade and forest management will be featured

The University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources’ Center for Agroforestry will host a workshop Saturday, April 29, at the Allen Project Site in Laurie, Mo.

The workshop will feature numerous hands-on demonstrations, as well as educational presentations.

The workshop will run from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and a lunch will be served.

“In keeping with Doug Allen’s vision, this farm will highlight ways that smaller Ozark farms can generate income,” said Dusty Walter, director of natural resources management, office of research and extension. “Set among the hills adjacent to the Lake of the Ozarks, this farm has a unique Ozark feel and contains landscape features that contribute to a unique field day opportunity. And, while a day is not enough time to see all this farm has to offer, we will highlight some features that make it a special place for learning, demonstration and education. We hope that by partnering with Doug and his vision for this property, that it becomes a valued regional source of information about land stewardship and profitable small-scale farming.”

The workshop will include discussions on natural beekeeping, forest management and control of invasive species with goats. The program will also include a visit to an active eagle nesting site and a discussion of birds, habitat and conservation. Attendees are encouraged to bring binoculars for the eagle nest viewing.

Gregory Ormsby Mori will discuss growing edible mushrooms and forest medicinals, like ginseng and other non-timber forest products, during the workshop.Gregory Ormsby Mori will discuss growing edible mushrooms and forest medicinals, like ginseng and other non-timber forest products, during the workshop.

Glade restoration and management will also be a key component of the day. According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, glades are dry, hot and sunny openings in the woodlands with shallow soil where the bedrock is close to the surface. A wide variety of native grasses and prairie wildflowers are usually found on glades, which support an abundance of insects.

“Any turkey hunter will tell you that turkey’s favorite food is bugs and good bugging habitat is crucial for successful brood rearing,” said Susan Farrington, a natural history biologist with MDC.

Attendees will also learn about growing edible mushrooms and forest medicinals, like ginseng and other non-timber forest products.

“Growing medicinal plants and edible mushrooms can be an economically viable option for small landowners in the Ozark region and can fit in well with an overall forest management plan,” said Gregory Ormsby Mori, outreach coordinator with the MU Center for Agroforestry.

The cost of the workshop is $10. Registration is due by Monday, April 24.

The Allen Research and Education project site is located east of Laurie, Mo., on “Old Eight,” which runs between highways O and P. The official address is 30118 Old Eight Road, Gravois Mill, MO 65037. The project site is in a valley east of this address.

The registration form, along with a check, which can be made out to the MU Center for Agroforestry, can be sent to Caroline Todd, Center for Agroforestry, 203 ABNR, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

For more information, contact Todd at (573) 884-2874 or ToddCS@missouri.edu.